Blessed anyway.


Here’s proof that you don’t have to be perfect to please God and reap tremendous blessings. In Genesis 26, Isaac and his family are living in Gerar, Israel. God had told him, basically, “Stay here and I’ll bless you big time.” Isaac had been thinking to move to Egypt because there was a famine in Israel at the time and Egypt had food, but he decided to obey God and stay in Gerar.

Women’s rights back then not being what they are today, I guess it wasn’t uncommon for the ruler of an area to take any attractive woman he saw as his own, killing the husband so the ruler wouldn’t have to put up with a fuss. Isaac was married to Rebekah, and she was beautiful. So he came up with the not-so-bright idea that if anyone asked her, she should say she was Isaac’s sister.

Eventually the truth came out and King Abimelek was like, “Why did you lie about this?! If any of my men had tried to make a move on her, that would have brought guilt on us!” Now, you might think the king would be really irked and kill Isaac just for the stress he had caused, but instead, Abimelek told everyone in his kingdom, “Leave Isaac and Rebekah totally alone, don’t harm them at all or I’ll have you killed!”

After that all went down, Isaac carried on with his life as a farmer and rancher, and he ended up becoming very rich, because God kept His promise to bless Isaac. And it wasn’t all just because Isaac was such a great guy, God had much bigger plans for Isaac’s descendants, culminating ultimately in his great-times 54 or so-grandson Jesus.

So my point is, Isaac definitely wasn’t perfect, but he did trust God, if only in a less-than-whole-hearted way, and God had made a promise to him. There are other examples of the exact same kind of thing in the Bible. We, as humans, are not perfect and God knows it. But if we trust Him, even with our often weak, incomplete, faith, He’ll keep His promises, and we have every reason to keep our eyes open for incoming blessings.

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